The Monsoon season in Phoenix may extend through April this year for the first time in the city’s history.

No, I’m not a meteorologist nor do I play Weather Guy on TV — although some people in the comment section have compared me to Brick Tamland in the past — but I do know a thing or two about the Sun(s’) affect on Phoenix.

The Monsoon is my nickname for Suns rookie Archie Goodwin that began to come into focus during July’s Vegas Summer League. Off the court, like the time before a monsoon strikes, it was obvious that he is calm and a mild mannered kid trying to learn the ins and outs of his new found fame and fortune. When he steps on the court it’s an instant change, like a storm rolling into Phoenix on a muggy summer afternoon — he is as quick as lightning and finishes stronger than thunder around the rim. He has an explosiveness to his game that can destroy a defense in a matter of seconds and leave people watching in awe by his power and grace.

Coach Jeff Hornacek sees it.

“He can fly up and down the court,” Hornacek told the radio home of the Suns Arizona Sports 620 . “You can see his speed and his ability. (When) he catches that ball out near the three point line on a fast break on the wing, it’s a one dribble and dunk.”

Don’t trust quotes. Just take this clip from a photoshoot done at the NBA rookie orientation and see for yourself.

Or how about this play from Summer League.

Sure, what we’ve seen from the young Kentucky guard has been in practice and games that don’t count, but the raw athleticism and potential is like the NBA’s version of Rosetta Stone, the kind of thing that translates on the court during the regular season. Head Coach Jeff Hornacek sees the potential and thinks Goodwin’s chance to shine is the present, not just the future.

“He’s going to contribute right away for us,” Hornacek said to Suns.com during Summer League. “In that respect he is now.”

The rain may have been hanging around the Valley for the last month, but the real Monsoon is coming to US Airways Center starting in October. If Suns fans are lucky, it’ll continue to be a torrential downpour for years to come.

About Greg Esposito

Hi, my name is Greg Esposito, my friends call me Espo and I’m a Phoenix Suns-aholic. I also happen to be the team's Social Media Specialist as well as one of the online content creators. You'll find my sarcastic musings here on Blog.Suns.com as the Suns Retorter.

  • Dylan Beavers

    Can’t wait to see Archie Play, this guy has major potential, could be the next Kobe Bryant. The suns better not trade this guy. With hornaceck as his coach he could have much higher field goal percentage than Kobe. Of course when I’m comparing Archie to Kobe I purely mean comparing Archie’s playing ability to Kobe’s playing ability, not to the jerk attitude that Bryant has.

  • http://liesllovesprettythings.blogspot.com/ Liesl (lieslloves)

    What about a sand storm?Or another name for that is black blizzard. I like the mongoose someone else mentions

  • nathan dylong

    Slow down Dylan Beavers. He has a LONG way to go before you can begin to make comparisons to any player of that level. I am definitely excited to see him play and grow also mainly because of 2 things: his athleticism, and his demeanor. There is no doubt he is confident in his abilities, but what’s special is that he lets his game do the talking for him and he seems like wants to be great and listening to his coaches will do that. He needs time..

  • Dylan Beavers

    Easy there, I wasn’t saying he was going to come rushing out of the gates and suddenly become Michael Jordan, I was just saying that the fact that he is only eighteen years old, and the fact that he has so many skills, shows that he his potential could be as high as Bryant’s.